After buying my boat I had to question if the previous owner had ever stepped foot inside the cabin as it took no time at all for my cabin sole to get filthy. The sole was not finished with anything at all besides some form of teak oil I later found to be Dalys Seafin TeakOil, and during my first season with the boat when I tried to do something to protect the sole which was rapidly getting water stains from wet feet and couple leaks that I had not yet repaired, I made the rookie mistake of asking someone at West Marine what would be good for that. I was directed to regular teak oil, and while it looked good the day it went on, and the water did stop soaking in and staining the wood, it also quickly started turning black with dirt. By the end of the season it was so bad that the holly inlay strips were no longer distinguishable from the now black teak.

Once the boat was hauled out for the winter I removed all of the cabin sole and proceeded to scrub the black out of it with a soft nylon brush and lots of citrus cleaner and degreaser to remove the dirt and all the teak oil that I had applied.  This process was quite messy, but after 3-4 washings like this and a fresh water rise between, eventually the wood started to return to it’s natural color, even the holly was restored to a nice off white. The only downside was that the surface was left very rough and pitted where some of the softer grain got cleaned out with the dirt and oil. Once everything had dried out for a few days I very lightly sanded everything with 220 grit on the random orbital sander at a low RPM as to not cut through the entire veneer, and then applied a couple coats of Seafin TeakOil for color and to seal the wood. You need let the Seafin completely dry otherwise it will make the Profin take a LOT longer to cure as the Profin will skin over and you now have the saturated wood trying to release the VOC’s from the Seafin, which are trapped by the semi dried Profin.  I made that mistake when redoing my flagpole, and it took over a week for the Profin to get hard to the touch.

Cabin Sole after Seafin, before applying Profin

Cabin Sole after Seafin, before applying Profin

 After the Seafin dried I was then applied the Profin Gloss thinned with a little Seafin per the recommendation of the engineer who formulated the product for them. I was lucky enough to reach him when I called Daly’s for information, and he was able to pull his old notes from 1990 and tell me exactly what Hunter was using when the boat was new, however my experience is that the Profin actually works better when you don’t thin it with the Seafin, and I will not be doing that anymore.

The end result looked like this.

Refinished Cabin Sole Installed
Refinished Cabin Sole Installed

 I have had this installed for a full 2 seasons now, and have found that the Profin has held up pretty well, but it needs a maintenance coat or two now to repair scuffs and some scratches. Many of the scuffs and scratches happened in the first month of it being installed as the finish continued to harden . After using the Profin on many additional projects since this I am very pleased with the performance, but have learned that it needs to be treated with care for the first 30 days as it does its final hardening.

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