Archive for the ‘Hardware’ Category

As you can see from the bottom of this old pic, my companionway steps were looking pretty dingy…

Slat Holders Installed

Slat Holders Installed

I figured that if I was going to start refinishing the interior, I might as well start with the entrance to the interior. Read the rest of this entry »

The previous owner must of had some leaks in the stanchions as he applied silicone over the the base of the stanchions and the bolts. I have been putting off rebedding them as they have not been leaking for me, but a month or so back we rafted up with a friend’s larger boat while in Port Jeff waiting for some torrential rain to ease up before we headed home, and ended up putting a good bit of stress on a couple of the starboard stanchions when the weather picked up before we could get the boats unrafted. No damage was done, but ever since then the stanchions that were stressed have been leaking.  I ordered a some butyl tape from Maine Sail to rebed the stanchions with. Read the rest of this entry »

My hatch seals were 21 years old, and were starting to leak, so I picked up a 10′ length of replacement seal from West Marine.  The old seals had flattened out and combined with their age, they had also shrunk to the point where the hatch did not even make contact with the seal at various spots anymore, this project was a little overdue.

Old gasket vs New gasket

Old gasket vs New gasket

Read the rest of this entry »

This part 2 of my Solar Panel related posts, the previous post being about the Solar Charge Controller

I drilled a hole and installed a 1/4″ cable outlet similar to this one over the starboard lazerette where the charge controller is located in order to run the power cable from the solar panel into the lazerette, thru-bolting with nylon locking nuts and sealing everything with 3M 4200  UV to keep from letting any water in.  I then installed the solar panel on the stern rail using the Sunsei solar panel mount.

Original Solar Panel Mount

Original Solar Panel Mount

 

Ganz 12w Solar Panel

Ganz 12w Solar Panel

Read the rest of this entry »

I wanted to add spreader lights to allow better use of the boat at night. Sometimes when anchoring it’s also nice to light the boat up for a midnight swim, or just to make it easier when cleaning things up at the dock after getting back after dark. I picked up 2 of the high output 600 lumen Dr LED Kevin Spreader lights, and 25ft of 16/4 tinned marine wire. I had the mast down in preparation for this, and had to cut the rivets off the mast base (sorry, forgot to take pics of that) to gain access to the conduit inside the mast.

For the actual installation I took off the steaming light and used it’s power wire to pull a length of twine up to the 3/4″ hole in the mast under the steaming light, then pulled the steaming light wire, along with 2 lengths of twine back down the mast with the first length of twine pulled up.  Leaving one length tied off as a backup we then pulled the new wire through the conduit and out the steaming light hole, where  the outer insulation was stripped leaving the 4 wires.  Read the rest of this entry »

 

My boat didn’t come with an electric bilge pump. Since I have an outboard, and the only original below the waterline thruhull was for the galley sink drain, and the rudder post sits above the waterline, I guess they decided it wasn’t needed.  Since the ice chest and head / shower floor drain both empty into the bilge, it can fill up pretty quick on a hot summer weekend  with melt water and if someone wants to rinse off in private.  I really wanted to install an automatic electric pump to keep the water level in check as I have on more than one occasion gone out for a sail and forgotten to manually pump out the water first, and when heeled over the water spills out onto the cabin sole and makes a big mess.

Due to the small volume of water the bilge can hold, and some old rule of thumb that I heard somewhere long ago, a reasonably sized working pump (aka non emergency pump) should be able to pump out the entire bilge in under 2 minutes, and about 30 seconds or less at the level the auto float switch kicks in.   Based on this, and the estimate that my bilge holds about 5 gallons, that means I only need a pump that can handle 2.5gal / min, or 150 gph (2.5*60). Since the smallest commonly available pump is 500 gph (at zero lift), I shouldn’t have a problem with this.   I also didn’t want an old float style auto switch as they are too easy to jam. I picked the Rule Mate 500 because it contains an integrated electronic water sensing float switch (i.e. no moving parts), and is rated at 250 gph with a 3ft lift (exactly what I happen to have). Read the rest of this entry »

Whenever I had the companionway open, I was always been struggleing with what to do with the slats when they were not in use. I had been stowing them between the companionway ladder and the bulkhead 5 inches to it’s port, but they sometimes fall out and crash to the floor, and put dents into the cabin sole when that happens. Additionally, you have to carry all 4 slats up / down the ladder at once, while not difficult, it is a pain in the stern section.

Companionway

Companionway -Before refinishing the slats

Last fall at the Annapollis boat show I checked out the new Tartans and saw that some of them have a rack to the side of the companionway that all the slats fit in. I liked the idea so much I decided to try and duplicate it.

Design

Not having the carpentry tools to make the parts myself, or space to put them if I bought them, I had a local carpenter / fellow boater make the parts up for me.  I don’t have enough space to duplicate the same design Tartan used as it would be in the way when walking down the companionway ladder so we had to come up with a few other ideas before we got it right.

After various concepts we came up with this for the final design;

Slat Holder (back)

Slat Holder (back)

Slat Holder (front)

Slat Holder (front)

The holders are teak, and I used a mixture of one part Dalys SeaFin Teak Oil to two parts Dalys ProFin Gloss to varnish them. The mixture was reccomended to me by an engineer at Dalys who formulated the products, and worked with Hunter back in the 90’s on blending them for their boats.

Installation

I mounted the holders on the bulkhead seperating the head from the cabin to the port side as you go down the ladder. I didn’t want to take a chance of cracking the wood, and had to be carefull about the depth I pre-drilled the holes.  So I measured my bit and carefully wrapped about 15 wraps of electricial tape around the bit at the correct depth.

Drill bit with depth limit

Drill bit with depth limit

I also had to trim the screws down with a pair of good quality wire cutters as they were slightly too long, and would punch out the other side of the bulkhead into the head. Below is a picture of the cut down screw, next to a full length screw.

cut down screw

cut down screw

Final Product

At the time of writing this I have 3 of the 4 holders installed, the 4th is pending a modification of a small compartment below the companionway ladder (you can see the corner of the compartment in the picture below with the slats in the holder) that holds things like 2-cycle engine oil, boat soap, etc. that would be blocked from opening until I move the hinge from the forward side, to the port side so it doesn’t swing up and into the holders, and instead swings open from the side.

Slat Holders Installed

Slat Holders Installed

Companionway slats in holders

Companionway slats in holders

I’ve been using this for a month plus now and found the holders to be very solid and sturdy, the slats do not rattle, and they are easy to get to, while staying out of the way. The system works quite well, I can’t wait to get the hatch below it modified so I can install the final holder.

 

Update:  Here is how everything looks after refinishing and varnishing everything.

Slats Installed - Varnished

Slats Installed - Varnished

Slats Installed - Varnished

Slats Installed - Varnished

Previously I covered the installation of the 1″ T track on the mast for the pole ring. The next step of the installation was to install a deck organizer block under the companionway hood to route the halyard back to the cockpit. Since I can forsee no reason that I would ever need to run another line back to the cockpit I opted to save a little expense and install a Schaefer Series 3 cheek block instead of a regular 2 or 3 line organizer block.  At the cockpit I installed a Spinlock XAS rope clutch to control the halyard with.

Cheek Block Installation

To install the cheek block I had to remove the 9 wood screws that hold the hood on, and then break the solid bead of 3M 4200 that hunter originally used all the way around the hood. To do this I ran a small knife through the bead cutting through it as best as I could, and then pulled the hood up.

Once the hood was off, and the old 4200 scraped and removed, I cleaned the underside of the hood with Tilex Mold and Mildew remover as the fiberglass had alot of dark mildew spots from years of damp sea air and perpetually being in the shade. To clean it, I simply sprayed it on, let everything sit for about 5 minutes, and then hosed it off, it looks brand new again.

To install the cheek block I positioned the block so the halyard would run straight back to where the rope clutch was to be installed, marked my 4 holes, and then drilled them. I first tried using stainless tapping sheet metal screws from West Marine as Hunter had the foresight to install at the factory a aluminum backing plate under the mounting pad, but the screws ended up snapping off under the simple leverage of a screw driver leaving me a useless set of holes with screws embedded in them that I was unable to remove. After re-drilling new mounting holes about 3/8″ outboard of the original holes I opted to tap the holes for a #10 machine screw, bedded the back of the block and holes with 3M 5200, then screwed it down tight, and cleaned up the excess 5200 with an acetone soaked paper towel. I have no expectation that this block will ever be removed for the life of the boat, otherwise I would have used 4200 or lifecaulk.

Cheek Block

Cheek block installed under companionway hood

Rope Clutch Installation

The installation of the rope clutch was pretty quick and easy. I ligned up the clutch on the factory designated installation / mounting pad and marked my holes, then removed the clutch and pre-drilled the holes for the #14 tapping screws, and then cranked the screws into the holes by hand with a large screw driver (this time the screws didn’t break off). I chose the tapping screws with the large sheetmetal style thhreads as they have more holding power than a machine screw because the threads are so much wider and cut much deeper into the metal. Once everything was ready to do the final installation, and the surface of the deck was cleaned with a acetone wipe down, I applied 3M 5200 into and around the holes, then screwed the rope clutch down tight, and cleaned up any excess 5200 that leaked out with a acetone soaked paper towel.

Completion

All that was left after this was to re-install the companionway hood, and reseal the edges with 4200.

Halyard Installation

Once everything else was complete, it was time to go up the mast and install the halyard. This was pretty straight forward, I went up the mast in a climbing harness and fed the bitter end of the halyard through the already existing spinnaker halyard exit directly above the forestay, and let gravity feed the line down the inside of the mast. When the halyard was visible from the exit gate at the base of the mast I used a hook shaped piece of wire and pulled the halyard to the exit, and then used a screw driver inserted past the main halyard on it’s exit gate which was opposite of the spinnaker halyard exit to push the line through.  Here is the Finished product. You can clearly see the V cleats for the lazy jacks that sit on either side of the T track.

I just had a new bimini added to the boat by Seafarer Canvas out of Norwalk. I stopped by their booth at the Norwalk boat show last fall. I had been looking into the various biminis available from online sources, and was considering an aluminum framed bimini from sailboatowners.com that had received good reviews, but Seafarer quoted me a stainless steel framed bimini, custom fit and installed, for only $50 more than I was looking at for the self installed aluminum framed bimini online, it was a no brainier and I ordered it on the spot. Read the rest of this entry »

Installed the track and car for the spinnaker pole and whisker pole padeye on the mast today. I went with the 1″ T track to ensure the car fits between the 2 V cleats mounted on the front of the mast for securing of the lazy jacks. The car slides between them with just a perfect amount of clearance on either side. Luckily for me the padeye car from ABI is just the right size for my little 14″ twist lock whisker pole that I picked up for a steal at west marine last season. It also sticks out far enough forward that I am able to rotate the whisker pole and use it as far aft as the drifter should ever need, so that also solves my previous described problem of having to use the shrouds to attach the whisker pole to when using the drifter.

I still need to install the padeye up the mast that I will use to hold the end of the pole upright for storage, and pick up a couple more screws for the top 2 holes of the track as between the screw bins at west marine and the deck of the boat, I somehow came up 2 short. Additionally I think I will need a Mast Mounted Pole Chock or two to hold the pole in place so it doesn’t rattle around when underway.

1 inch Mast T-Track with ABI padeye car

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